The most beautiful cities in the world according to science and the “golden ratio” – Chester is number 1

0

According to science, the most beautiful city in the world is Chester.

The walled cathedral city in north-west England has the highest percentage of buildings – 83.7% – that align with the ‘golden ratio’, a study has found.

Using this ratio as a guide, the researchers came up with a ranking of the most eye-catching cities on the planet, with Venice in second place. It has a “beauty score” of 83.3%. In third place is London (83%). Fourth place is occupied by Belfast (82.9%), while Rome slips to fifth place with 82%.

Chester is the most beautiful city in the world, according to science, because it has the most buildings that match the “golden ratio”. The researchers scanned Google Street View to find face-on photos of thousands of “iconic” buildings and streets lined with houses in towns around the world, before plotting points at the corners of each building to calculate the “proportion of longest and shortest of its dimensions. . These proportions were then compared to the golden ratio (1:1.618) to see how closely they matched. For reasons that can’t really be explained, humans find objects that unfold with this inherently beautiful rapport. Above, Chester’s Eastgate Street

Second-placed Venice (pictured above), known as the City of Water, scores 83.3%.

Second-placed Venice (pictured above), known as the City of Water, scores 83.3%.

London was revealed as the third most beautiful city in the world with a score of 83%.  Above is the city's St. Paul's <a class=Cathedral, which was previously named the most beautiful building in the world because it closely adheres to the “golden ratio” formula with an alignment of 72.28%” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

London was revealed as the third most beautiful city in the world with a score of 83%. Above is the city’s St. Paul’s Cathedral, which was previously named the most beautiful building in the world because it closely adheres to the “golden ratio” formula with an alignment of 72.28%

The rest of the top 10 is made up of Barcelona (sixth, 81.9%), Liverpool (seventh, 81%), Durham (eighth, 80.5%), Bristol (ninth, 80%) and Oxford (10th, 79, 7 percent).

The highest-ranked US city is New York, which ranks 17th with a score of 77.7%.

What is the golden ratio? It has long been used as a beauty barometer and its numerical ratio is 1:1.618. So a building that aligns with it would contain forms and structures that have a relationship with each other in that ratio.

For reasons that can’t really be explained, humans find objects that expand with this inherently beautiful expansion ratio.

THE TOP 20 MOST BEAUTIFUL CITIES IN THE WORLD – ACCORDING TO SCIENCE

1. Chester, UK – 83.7% Golden Ratio Alignment

2. Venice, Italy – 83.3%

3. London, UK – 83%

4. Belfast, UK – 82.9%

5. Rome, Italy – 82%

6. Barcelona, ​​Spain – 81.9%

seven. Liverpool, UK – 81%

8. Durham, UK – 80.5%

9. Bristol, UK – 80%

ten. Oxford, UK – 79.7%

11. Birmingham, UK – 79.4%

12 = Edinburgh, UK – 78.9%

12 = Cardiff, UK – 78.9%

13. Prague, Czech Republic – 78.7%

14. Exeter, UK – 78.5%

15. Bath, UK – 78.2%

16. Canterbury, UK – 77.8%

17. New York, USA – 77.7%

18. Worcester, UK – 77.6%

19. Athens, Greece – 77.5%

20. Cambridge, UK – 76.1%

Ssource : Online Mortgage Advisor

Fourth place goes to Belfast (82.9%).  Pictured is Belfast City Hall in Donegall Square

Fourth place goes to Belfast (82.9%). Pictured is Belfast City Hall in Donegall Square

Above is the ancient Colosseum in Rome - the Italian capital slips to fifth place with 82%

Above is the ancient Colosseum in Rome – the Italian capital slips to fifth place with 82%

Barcelona sit sixth overall with 81.9%.  Above, the city's iconic Sagrada Familia

Barcelona sit sixth overall with 81.9%. Above, the city’s iconic Sagrada Familia

Above is the Liverpool skyline with the clock tower of the Royal Liver Building in the centre.  The northern city ranks seventh with 81%

Above is the Liverpool skyline with the clock tower of the Royal Liver Building in the centre. The northern city ranks seventh with 81%

Fascinatingly, this “golden ratio” is found in Sonic the Hedgehog’s head, in flowers, waves, and even galaxies.

This YouTube video explains it brilliantly and reveals even more mind-blowing examples of where the ratio can be found.

For the city rankings, created by Online Mortgage Advisor, researchers scanned Google Street View for face-on photos of hundreds of streets and more than 2,400 buildings in historic cities around the world.

Then they plotted points at the corners of each building to calculate the “proportion of the longest and shortest lengths of its dimensions”.

These proportions were then compared to the golden ratio (1:1.618) to see how closely they matched.

The highest-ranked US city is New York (above), taking 17th place with a score of 77.7%.

The highest-ranked US city is New York (above), taking 17th place with a score of 77.7%.

The third most beautiful building in the world is Westminster Abbey in London (above), according to the golden ratio

The third most beautiful building in the world is Westminster Abbey in London (above), according to the golden ratio

We previously revealed that Sir Christopher Wren’s St. Paul’s Cathedral in London is the most beautiful building in the world, as it closely adheres to the ‘golden ratio’ formula with an alignment of 72.28%.

The Marina Bay Sands resort (70.88%) in Singapore, meanwhile, was revealed as the second most beautiful building in the world, based on the ‘golden ratio’ analysis, while the Westminster Abbey in London (70.50%) came third.

Commenting on the research, Online Mortgage Advisor said: “Many artists over the past few centuries have incorporated the golden ratio into their work, believing it to be a gold standard of natural aesthetic perfection. Using the golden ratio to measure regular buildings and iconic landmarks, we set out to find out which city in the UK and around the world can claim to have the most beautiful buildings.

Visitcheshire.com says: ‘Chester has the most comprehensive city walls, oldest hippodrome and largest Roman amphitheater in Britain, plus a 1,000-year-old cathedral with the finest example of medieval carvings in Europe. . The ancient city is a truly breathtaking experience.

Learn more about the top 20 most beautiful cities here.

THE GOLDEN RATIO EXPLAINED

Fans of Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code will remember when the protagonist, Professor Langton, explains how math and art collide via the “golden ratio”.

For those who haven’t read the populist thriller, it’s the number 1.618, which was ripped from the famous Fibonacci sequence.

In this sequence, each number is the sum of the previous two, so it is 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34. If you take two successive numbers, their ratio is very close to 1.618.

It’s not that impressive on its own. Until you realize this report is the key to everything from computer data encryption to the number of spirals on a sunflower head, our own limbs and why the Mona Lisa is so pleasing to the eye.

Some have argued that because the sequence seems to grow “organically”, the golden ratio may play a role in nature.

The ratio of 1.618 has already been found externally all over the human body. It usually marks the proportion of your hand to your forearm as well as the distance between your three knuckles on each finger.

The spiraling numbers in a sunflower will always total one Fibonacci number, while dividing those pointing right and left will give you two consecutive Fibonacci numbers related by the ratio 1.68. These spiral patterns are also found in pineapples, cauliflowers and pine cones.

Share.

Comments are closed.