L’Antidote: Five happy things to read today, November 30

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Chrystall the yellow-eyed penguin has survived three shark encounters.

Wildlife Hospital / Provided

Chrystall the yellow-eyed penguin has survived three shark encounters.

We are living in unusual times. There is a pandemic. The planet is dying. Everything gets a little loud some days. So, every day of the week, we bring you a much needed dose of positivity to remind you that there is inspiration, kindness and eccentricity too.

The incredible survival story of Chrystall the hoiho

After surviving three shark attacks, Crystall the yellow-eyed penguin (hoihoi) is now a mother of two.

Crystall was one of Dunedin Wildlife Hospital’s first clients in 2017 after she was found with multiple wounds from a shark attack, but her touch with death did not end there.

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Yellow eyed penguin chicks at Dunedin Wildlife Hospital.

WILDLIFE HPITAL / Provided

Yellow eyed penguin chicks at Dunedin Wildlife Hospital.

In 2018 and 2019, she was readmitted to hospital, after again suffering injuries from shark attacks.

Now, two years later, Crystall has become a mother to two chicks, aptly named Ruby and Sapphire.

The happy news is also a relief for the hospital team, after fearing that Crystall’s exposure to humans may have disrupted his natural behaviors.

They went to the pub to see an Oasis tribute band and got stuck for three days

At first glance, this may not seem like a “happy” story, but it’s the perfect example of making the most of a not-so-ideal situation.

On Friday (local time), punters drove to the Tan Hill Inn in the Yorkshire Dales – the tallest pub in the UK – but ended up spending three days together after Storm Arwen brought snow and snow strong winds, making the trip too dangerous.

There were 61 people stuck in the pub, along with four dogs, sleeping on sofas and mattresses spread out on the stone flagged floor.

In addition to the acoustic performances of Noasis – now dubbed Snow-asis – the trapped group watched films projected on a projector and enjoyed the well-stocked bar and kitchen, The Guardian reported. There was also a quiz night.

The Tan Hill Inn after another snowfall last March.

Danny Lawson / AP

The Tan Hill Inn after another snowfall last March.

The group was treated to a traditional Sunday lunch, including slices of roasted meat for canine guests when dog food supplies ran out.

On Monday, guests managed to exit their vehicles one by one, AP reporting that the pub manager said the guests were “in a very good mood.”

“They formed a whole friendship… like a big family is the best way to describe it,” she said. “A lady actually said ‘I don’t want to leave.'”

Amur tiger footprint spotted for the first time in 50 years in Russia’s coldest region

The tracks of a rare Amur tiger have been spotted for the first time in 50 years in Russia’s coldest region, a sign the endangered species may bounce back from extinction.

The tracks of an Amur tiger were discovered in the coldest part of Russia - the first time they have been spotted in the region in 50 years.  (File photo)

Joe giddens

The tracks of an Amur tiger were discovered in the coldest part of Russia – the first time they have been spotted in the region in 50 years. (File photo)

Footprints, discovered in the Sakha region of Russia by the country’s forest protection service, show the animals are beginning to expand their hunting grounds in an area that for the past 50 years has been difficult for them to gain a foothold.

The tiger population has grown from 330 in 2005 to over 660 today thanks to conservation efforts, and experts say the fact that they are exploring their ancestral hunting grounds indicates that the number of northernmost big cats does not is not a current concern.

Young man supplies 10,000 people with renewable energy without battery, wind, sun, water

A young man won the world’s top student award for his invention that provides electricity to homes without the need for batteries, wind, sun, or water.

Jeremiah Thoronka won US $ 100,000 (NZ $ 146,400) for his invention that uses the kinetic energy of cars and pedestrians passing on the roads – the machine currently supplies electricity to 150 small houses.

The most prestigious award was presented to Thoronka in a virtual ceremony from Unesco headquarters in Paris earlier this month, in the presence of Australian actor Hugh Jackman to congratulate him as well.

Winning the award, the 21-year-old Sierra Leone who is currently studying for a Masters in Sustainable Development at Durham University in the UK said “It’s amazing, it’s wonderful”.

Adding: “Words cannot express how I feel about this,” the BBC reported.

Actor Hugh Jackman congratulates Jeremiah Thoronka on winning the inaugural Global Student Prize.

Chegg.org/Youtube

Actor Hugh Jackman congratulates Jeremiah Thoronka on winning the inaugural Global Student Prize.

BBC interview recording of late grandmother found in old office

Lucy James and her grandmother Margaret were featured in a BBC News Report in 2008 and after her grandmother’s death in 2019, James contacted BBC Radio Stoke to find out if the recording still existed.

A former producer contacted James after a CD was found in the drawer of an old desk that was about to be thrown away.

James, now 27, was invited to listen to the recording for the first time live on air. Hearing the recording of her late “Mama” moved her to tears.

“I feel very privileged and lucky to have her voice on this and to have known her,” James told BBC Radio Stoke.

“I can’t thank you enough for finding this.” “

Listen to the recording and James’ emotional reaction here.


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